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Who is your Favourite Guest Rebel?

Avalon - (Project Avalon)
Avalon - (Project Avalon)
24% [34 Votes]

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Selma - (Horizon)
3% [5 Votes]

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Hal Mellanby - (Aftermath)
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5% [7 Votes]

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Started: 09 July 2016

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What are you reading?
One Spare Part
Travisina wrote:

One Spare Part wrote:

Finished reading Busman's Honeymoon, the last full length Peter Wimsey story. I didn't really 'get' it 1st time of reading. So I got so much more from it this time around. But what shall I read next?

Having now read 'Evelyn Hardcastle' twice, I'm now re-discovering some very early Agatha Christies. So far: 'The Mysterious Affair at Styles' - her first novel, that introduces Poirot. Now reading 'The Secret Adversary', which introduces Tommy & Tuppence - not a murder mystery but a jolly spy adventure romp, very Hitchcock (but predating him by several decades).

These are fascinating for all sorts of reasons - including her early writing style and the period in which they were written. World War 1 looms large - 'Styles' was written in 1916, though not published until 1920 after being rejected 6 times. 'Secret Adversary' has a prologue set in 1915, on the sinking Lusitania, but the main story takes place shortly after the end of the War - Tommy & Tuppence have finished their wartime jobs and are now looking for work. They're the epitome of the Bright Young Things of the 1920s. The government is worried about the Labour party organising unions and workers' strikes, and that the Russians are behind it.
Plus ca change!

Love Christie. She may not be regarded as a literary type but she wrote some great books. She must have done something right to still figure so largely in today's culture. And you are right about her other works being of interest too. Have you read Endless Night? They did it as a film with Hywel Bennett and Hayley Mills. Very good but the book is very interesting. Atypical for Christie. Welcome back, Travisina btw, you've been missed. It's been very quiet... Grin
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
rojkerr1
love And then there were none
 
Travisina
One Spare Part wrote:

Love Christie. She may not be regarded as a literary type but she wrote some great books. She must have done something right to still figure so largely in today's culture. And you are right about her other works being of interest too. Have you read Endless Night? They did it as a film with Hywel Bennett and Hayley Mills. Very good but the book is very interesting. Atypical for Christie. Welcome back, Travisina btw, you've been missed. It's been very quiet... Grin

Aw, thanks OSP! It's nice to get away from it all, but also nice to get back to it all Smile

I've not read Endless Night - will have to seek it out. I read a quote by somebody (possibly Robert 'I Claudius' Graves - they were friends) that praises Christie's storytelling, and that not all books have to be 'literary' in order to be good.

Talking of which, while on holiday my brother pressed upon me the latest Jeffrey Archer ('Heads You Win' ) saying I *HAD* to read it. So I read it to please my bro, hoovering it up in about 48 hours. Best described as fast and shallow, breathlessly plot-driven, with under-developed characters and too many 'yeah, but...' moments. But I did keep turning the pages (very quickly), and it was possibly worth it for the final line which I won't reveal here (spolier alert - if you like this sort of thing, do not read the last page first!).
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
Travisina
rojkerr1 wrote:

love And then there were none

Oh yeah, I think that's one of her very best - absolutely brilliant. But the first time I read it, I ruined it for myself by reading the last page first, so I knew all along whodunnit, argh! I was only 11 at the time, and should be forgiven, but it was a salutory lesson in spoiler avoidance (see comment above re latest Jeffrey Archer!)
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
One Spare Part
Travisina wrote:

One Spare Part wrote:

Love Christie. She may not be regarded as a literary type but she wrote some great books. She must have done something right to still figure so largely in today's culture. And you are right about her other works being of interest too. Have you read Endless Night? They did it as a film with Hywel Bennett and Hayley Mills. Very good but the book is very interesting. Atypical for Christie. Welcome back, Travisina btw, you've been missed. It's been very quiet... Grin

Aw, thanks OSP! It's nice to get away from it all, but also nice to get back to it all Smile

I've not read Endless Night - will have to seek it out. I read a quote by somebody (possibly Robert 'I Claudius' Graves - they were friends) that praises Christie's storytelling, and that not all books have to be 'literary' in order to be good.

Talking of which, while on holiday my brother pressed upon me the latest Jeffrey Archer ('Heads You Win' ) saying I *HAD* to read it. So I read it to please my bro, hoovering it up in about 48 hours. Best described as fast and shallow, breathlessly plot-driven, with under-developed characters and too many 'yeah, but...' moments. But I did keep turning the pages (very quickly), and it was possibly worth it for the final line which I won't reveal here (spolier alert - if you like this sort of thing, do not read the last page first!).

He is very popular with our library users but I must admit I am prejudiced against him, so I won't ever read his stuff. Just a little foible of mine. But they do talk admiringly about his cliff hanger endings, so he must be doing something right. As painful as it is for me to admit that.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
rojkerr1
as Clive Anderson memorably said to him- 'there's no beginning to your talent is there...?'
 
One Spare Part
rojkerr1 wrote:

as Clive Anderson memorably said to him- 'there's no beginning to your talent is there...?'

Brilliant! And true! Did he end that show with the Marxian "I've had a wonderful evening but this wasn't it!"?
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
Travisina
rojkerr1 wrote:

as Clive Anderson memorably said to him- 'there's no beginning to your talent is there...?'

GrinGrin
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
rojkerr1
I love the Marx brothers, maybe he said don't leave in a huff, leave in a minute and a huff...
 
rojkerr1
New james Bond, Forever and a day, pre casino royale novel
 
BradPaula
The Curse of Oak Island by Randall Sullivan.
Zil: Oneness must resist the Host.
 
Vanessa Doffenshmirtz
I got the first three "Six Tudor Queens" by Alison Weir for Mother's Day.

Just started Katherine of Carry-on.
I used to be such a sweet sweet thing
Till they got a hold of me.
 
One Spare Part
Vanessa Doffenshmirtz wrote:

I got the first three "Six Tudor Queens" by Alison Weir for Mother's Day.

Just started Katherine of Carry-on.

I have read her non fiction and loved it. Not yet tried her fiction. I don't know why, her history books were very readable, not at all dry. Made history come alive.
"We're in the centre of a mystical convergence here."
 
Travisina
Our Book Club meeting on Tuesday had a lively discussion about all things Agatha Christie. We'd all read different books (I'd managed three and a half), and opinions ranged from those who loved her, those who found her books okay but dated and a bit formulaic, and those who didn't like her at all. So lively was the discussion that we didn't pause for coffee & cake until 10pm, by which time I was ravenous, as I'd come straight from work & hadn't had dinner.

We then couldn't decide what to read next, with various suggestions being raised and dismissed - or those agreed upon being hard to find (since when has JB Priestley been out of print?). So for the time being, we've gone for Jilly Cooper's Riders as an entertaining summer read.
Obvs, I then couldn't get hold of 'Riders' - it's on order at my lovely library, and in the meantime I've taken out JC's 'Rivals'. They're all much the same, anyway.
Twitter: @TravisinaB7
Tumblr: tumblr
There's no point being grown up if you can't be childish sometimes
 
rojkerr1
another bond, the man with red tattoo
 
Vanessa Doffenshmirtz
One Spare Part wrote:

Vanessa Doffenshmirtz wrote:

I got the first three "Six Tudor Queens" by Alison Weir for Mother's Day.

Just started Katherine of Carry-on.

I have read her non fiction and loved it. Not yet tried her fiction. I don't know why, her history books were very readable, not at all dry. Made history come alive.


I've read Innocent Traitor and The Lady Elisabeth before. the stories are sufficiently engaging to be a quick read.

Weir's non-fiction is less pleasing to me as I find her writing lacking depth and she doesn't footnote. It's light and easy to get through but I like to know where she found her initial sources. She occasionally finds information I'd never heard before. She said the Henry donned mourning on May 21st for the "death" of Anne Boleyn. Two days after her execution and a day after his betrothal to Jane. (Six Wives)

I was disappointed to find that the family tree of KoA and HVIII had an error in it. Not an impressive start.

eta...The compiler had Constance of Castile as John of Gaunt's first wife.
I used to be such a sweet sweet thing
Till they got a hold of me.
 
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